Chandler Arizona
To Chaco Canyon

Anasazi Agriculture: Rain, Soil, Seeds, Survival 5335932579643.jpg

Anasazi Agriculture: Rain, Soil, Seeds, and Survival

Anasazi refers to the physical remains of a pre-Columbian peasant individuals who lived about a thousand years earlier in the Four Corners region of Colorado, roughly the age of today's Pueblo people. Due to their geographical location, the Anasazi cultures were divided into three primary locations or branches: the Colorado Plateau, the Puleos and the Rio Grande Valley. Their archaeological sites lie in Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, California, Texas, Mexico and New York. Modern Pueblo oral traditions state that it came from Lake Shibapu, where the underworld originated from the depths of the Colorado River and the Puleos River, the source of water from which the Anasazi drink. In an unknown age, the Great Spirit who led North America led the Anasazi, a group of people from the Pueblo area of Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona, to the Colorado River.

Anasazi: Hisatsinom to the Hopi

Firstly, there is evidence that the Pueblo individuals are modern-day descendants of the Anasazi. The Navajo, who continually feuded with the "Anasazis," descendants of both the Pueblos and the Hopi Indians, are called after them, the senior citizens of southern Utah. They inhabited big parts of southern Utah along with parts of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah and Arizona. The Navajo are named after the Anasazis, the Pueblos after the Hopi, but not after the Navajo, who are the descendants of the "Anasazi. " The dividing line is popular - in the history of the Navajo Country as well as in numerous other parts of Arizona and New Mexico. While the Anasazi and Hopi were farmers, the Navajo and Apaches were hunters - gatherers who raided farm villages. After Navajo was annihilated by a United States federal government campaign in the 1860s, they turned their backs on the Apaches and turned to farming. The Hopis consider themselves the rightful descendants of the ancient Apaches, a position supported by archaeologists. He states, however, that there is no evidence that Pueblo people reside in the area today, and the way of living and his claims to the land have actually brought a lot more disputes with the Hopi.

Buy & Download for PC / Windows Computers: